Redesigned (and rebranded) hilarious mobile party game

Redesigned (and rebranded) hilarious mobile party game

Redesigned (and rebranded) hilarious mobile party game

Organization:

Spotlightly

App:

Endship

Timeframe:

Several months in 2020, 2023

My role:

Sole designer

Tools:

Figma

Organization:

Spotlightly

App:

Endship

Timeframe:

Several months in 2020, 2023

My role:

Lead UX Designer (FT),

UX Consultant

Tools:

Figma

Organization:

Spotlightly

App:

Endship

Timeframe:

Several months in 2020, 2023

My role:

Sole designer

Tools:

Figma

Industry

Entertainment
Entertainment

Headquarters

Toronto
Toronto

Founded

2017
2017

Endship is a mobile party game where players get prompts about each other, and they vote on the best responses. I redesigned the UX, UI, and even rebranded the game to make it more modern and user-friendly.

Endship is a mobile party game where players get prompts about each other, and they vote on the best responses. I redesigned the UX, UI, and even rebranded the game to make it more modern and user-friendly.

3x

more games started

more games started

3x

increased "fun" rating by players

increased "fun" rating by players

2x

more iOS downloads

more iOS downloads

Industry

Entertainment

Headquarters

Toronto

Founded

2017

Endship is a mobile party game where players get prompts about each other, and they vote on the best responses. I redesigned the UX, UI, and even rebranded the game to make it more modern and user-friendly.

3x

more games started

3x

increased "fun" rating by players

2x

more iOS downloads

Context and research

Competitive analysis

Endship was designed to be a fun party game with friends who can playfully joke about each other. From a game design standpoint, there are 3 major features:

  • Creative: Players come up with their own responses.

  • Humorous: The content is inherently funny, due to how the game is set up.

  • Personalized: Content is about players, not just other topics.

Context and research

Competitive analysis

Endship was designed to be a fun party game with friends who can playfully joke about each other. From a game design standpoint, there are 3 major features:

  • Creative: Players come up with their own responses.

  • Humorous: The content is inherently funny, due to how the game is set up.

  • Personalized: Content is about players, not just other topics.

Context and research

Competitive analysis

Endship was designed to be a fun party game with friends who can playfully joke about each other. From a game design standpoint, there are 3 major features:

  • Creative: Players come up with their own responses.

  • Humorous: The content is inherently funny, due to how the game is set up.

  • Personalized: Content is about players, not just other topics.

User research and proto-personas

Through hundreds of rounds observed by the original game developer, and several post-gameplay interviews, I came up with two proto-personas representing the main user types.

User research and proto-personas

Through hundreds of rounds observed by the original game developer, and several post-gameplay interviews, I came up with two proto-personas representing the main user types.

User research and proto-personas

Through hundreds of rounds observed by the original game developer, and several post-gameplay interviews, I came up with two proto-personas representing the main user types.

Why Endship “v1” needed a redesign

Endship initially entailed creating a game room that others joined online. Each round, they’d all write answers, and select their favorite responses.

This multi-device UX was the original vision of Endship, but my research indicated some unexpected limitations, including:

1. Logistics

Playtime was often limited due to someone in the group having low batteries.

2. Friction

Everyone needed to download the app, create a new account, join a room, etc.

3. Timing

Since players read responses on their own devices, the fun “answer reveal” wasn't such a social experience.

Why Endship “v1” needed a redesign

Endship initially entailed creating a game room that others joined online. Each round, they’d all write answers, and select their favorite responses.

This multi-device UX was the original vision of Endship, but my research indicated some unexpected limitations, including:

1. Logistics

Playtime was often limited due to someone in the group having low batteries.

2. Friction

Everyone needed to download the app, create a new account, join a room, etc.

3. Timing

Since players read responses on their own devices, the fun “answer reveal” wasn't such a social experience.

Why Endship “v1” needed a redesign

Endship initially entailed creating a game room that others joined online. Each round, they’d all write answers, and select their favorite responses.

This multi-device UX was the original vision of Endship, but my research indicated some unexpected limitations, including:

1. Logistics

Playtime was often limited due to someone in the group having low batteries.

2. Friction

Everyone needed to download the app, create a new account, join a room, etc.

3. Timing

Since players read responses on their own devices, the fun “answer reveal” wasn't such a social experience.

Redesign and rebrand

Starting the rebrand with categories

The foundation of the redesign came from visualizing the game categories as decks from a card game, with simple monochromatic illustrations.

Redesign and rebrand

Starting the rebrand with categories

The foundation of the redesign came from visualizing the game categories as decks from a card game, with simple monochromatic illustrations.

Redesign and rebrand

Starting the rebrand with categories

The foundation of the redesign came from visualizing the game categories as decks from a card game, with simple monochromatic illustrations.

Designing a new look

I fleshed out a new brand identity by replacing the “submarine” motif with a “pirate ship” theme, while maintaining its quirky charm.

I took this solid-color aesthetic and redesigned the landing page and mobile app with it.

Designing a new look

I fleshed out a new brand identity by replacing the “submarine” motif with a “pirate ship” theme, while maintaining its quirky charm.

I took this solid-color aesthetic and redesigned the landing page and mobile app with it.

Designing a new look

I fleshed out a new brand identity by replacing the “submarine” motif with a “pirate ship” theme, while maintaining its quirky charm.

I took this solid-color aesthetic and redesigned the landing page and mobile app with it.

UX and UI redesign

  1. Starting a new game

The new UX offloads the game set-up to one person. Since there's usually one eager player to introduce the game to friends, this UX facilitates word of mouth.

  1. Completing a round

By using progressive disclosure (showing only what’s necessary when it’s necessary), each step per round is simple and intuitive.

UX and UI redesign

  1. Starting a new game

The new UX offloads the game set-up to one person. Since there's usually one eager player to introduce the game to friends, this UX facilitates word of mouth.

  1. Completing a round

By using progressive disclosure (showing only what’s necessary when it’s necessary), each step per round is simple and intuitive.

UX and UI redesign

  1. Starting a new game

The new UX offloads the game set-up to one person. Since there's usually one eager player to introduce the game to friends, this UX facilitates word of mouth.

  1. Completing a round

By using progressive disclosure (showing only what’s necessary when it’s necessary), each step per round is simple and intuitive.

Game modes

Two versatile ways of playing

  • Shouting mode: A lively mode where the captain (the player whose turn it is) gives points as people roast them, by shouting their responses

  • Writing mode: Where players have a minute to write their answer offline (eg. with pen and paper)

Toasts: "Safe mode"

Toasts — a variation of "roasts" where players are set up for compliments — is effectively the way to play when you want to ensure no one's feelings are hurt.

Game modes

Two versatile ways of playing

  • Shouting mode: A lively mode where the captain (the player whose turn it is) gives points as people roast them, by shouting their responses

  • Writing mode: Where players have a minute to write their answer offline (eg. with pen and paper)

Toasts: "Safe mode"

Toasts — a variation of "roasts" where players are set up for compliments — is effectively the way to play when you want to ensure no one's feelings are hurt.

Game modes

Two versatile ways of playing

  • Shouting mode: A lively mode where the captain (the player whose turn it is) gives points as people roast them, by shouting their responses

  • Writing mode: Where players have a minute to write their answer offline (eg. with pen and paper)

Toasts: "Safe mode"

Toasts — a variation of "roasts" where players are set up for compliments — is effectively the way to play when you want to ensure no one's feelings are hurt.

Key takeaways

  1. Never ignore the context of use: The original game was designed with playing at home in mind, where people could charge their mobile devices anytime; but this was usually not the case. And when even one person had low batteries, most groups stopped playing rather than excluding them.

  2. Don’t just reinvent the wheel: While the “shouting mode” creates a lively fast-paced experience, we didn’t want to get rid of the “write for a minute, vote at the end” UX, which is a familiar game design pattern. The solution was simply to make two game modes, and let players pick.

  3. The importance of colors and backgrounds: Picking colors was surprisingly difficult because of how many were needed (eg. over a dozen deck designs). But I found that keeping a solid color (sky blue) as a background not only elevated the design, but made it significantly easier to work with, compared to the gradient from the initial version of the game.

Key takeaways

  1. Never ignore the context of use: The original game was designed with playing at home in mind, where people could charge their mobile devices anytime; but this was usually not the case. And when even one person had low batteries, most groups stopped playing rather than excluding them.

  2. Don’t just reinvent the wheel: While the “shouting mode” creates a lively fast-paced experience, we didn’t want to get rid of the “write for a minute, vote at the end” UX, which is a familiar game design pattern. The solution was simply to make two game modes, and let players pick.

  3. The importance of colors and backgrounds: Picking colors was surprisingly difficult because of how many were needed (eg. over a dozen deck designs). But I found that keeping a solid color (sky blue) as a background not only elevated the design, but made it significantly easier to work with, compared to the gradient from the initial version of the game.

Key takeaways

  1. Never ignore the context of use: The original game was designed with playing at home in mind, where people could charge their mobile devices anytime; but this was usually not the case. And when even one person had low batteries, most groups stopped playing rather than excluding them.

  2. Don’t just reinvent the wheel: While the “shouting mode” creates a lively fast-paced experience, we didn’t want to get rid of the “write for a minute, vote at the end” UX, which is a familiar game design pattern. The solution was simply to make two game modes, and let players pick.

  3. The importance of colors and backgrounds: Picking colors was surprisingly difficult because of how many were needed (eg. over a dozen deck designs). But I found that keeping a solid color (sky blue) as a background not only elevated the design, but made it significantly easier to work with, compared to the gradient from the initial version of the game.